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lgbt_history

lgbt_history Have Pride In History® Matthew Riemer & Leighton Brown Authors of "We Are Everywhere,” @tenspeedpress [email protected] https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/570409/we-are-everywhere-by-leighton-brown-and-matthew-riemer/
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Marsha P. Johnson & Sylvia Rivera, Christopher Street Liberation Day, June 24, 1973. Photo by Leonard Fink, c/o @lgbtcenternyc.
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On June 24, 1973, during the fourth annual Christopher Street Liberation Day, tensions within New York’s queer community boiled over in a very public way. The commotion—which, Stephan L. Cohen summarizes, consisted of “Sylvia [Rivera] storming the stage to speak out for imprisoned transgender half-sisters, [Jean] O’Leary condemning men who impersonated women for entertainment and profit, and [Lee] Brewster castigating lesbians for their refusal to let drag queens be themselves”—demands more detail than afforded by an Instagram post. For now, we offer excerpts from Arthur Bell’s “Hostility Comes Out of the Closet,” written days after the event:
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“The whole thing with the bars & the baths & the women & the transvestites & the ideologies & the middle class is so fucking complex. There are really no heroes & just 1 or 2 villains. The liberals, the establishment, & the hardhat gays are into the status quo. The system is good now, they feel. Why bother with the crazies? Those who aren’t willing to compromise, who have visions of a new & better world, are the crazies. They are also the true liberationists.
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“When the gay lib movement sprung up, we were all crazies. As we became popular, & the middle class invaded, our ideology changed, & we acquired property for our functions. We needed money to pay for our property, so we went to the bars & baths to get cash. A little at first. Then a lot. Then we became dependent on property & the focus of the movement was the balance sheet. And the crazies dropped out. The Sylvias were summoned only when the spectacle of an angry fighter looked terrific on tv. And Sylvia would go to jail for us. But nix on the outrage at the social functions.
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“Rich old daddies don’t support transvestites. Nor do they will their money to liberation movements. So one has to go outside for support. . . . This year, [Pride cost] $4500. Last year, [it] cost pennies. . . . However, a lot of people saw a terrific show. My roommate said it was the best day of his life. Sylvia said it was the worst day of hers.” #Resist
6 2,729 54 minutes ago
Marsha p. johnson & sylvia rivera, christopher street liberation day, june 24, 1973. photo by leonard fink, c/o @lgbtcenternyc.
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on june 24, 1973, during the fourth annual christopher street liberation day, tensions within new york’s q***r community boiled over in a very public way. the commotion—which, stephan l. cohen summarizes, consisted of “sylvia [rivera] storming the stage to speak out for imprisoned transgender half-sisters, [jean] o’leary condemning men who impersonated women for entertainment and profit, and [lee] brewster castigating l******s for their refusal to let drag queens be themselves”—demands more detail than afforded by an instagram post. for now, we offer excerpts from arthur bell’s “hostility comes out of the closet,” written days after the event:
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“the whole thing with the bars & the baths & the women & the transvestites & the ideologies & the middle class is so f*****g complex. there are really no heroes & just 1 or 2 villains. the liberals, the establishment, & the hardhat g**s are into the status quo. the system is good now, they feel. why bother with the crazies? those who aren’t willing to compromise, who have visions of a new & better world, are the crazies. they are also the true liberationists.
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“when the g*y lib movement sprung up, we were all crazies. as we became popular, & the middle class invaded, our ideology changed, & we acquired property for our functions. we needed money to pay for our property, so we went to the bars & baths to get cash. a little at first. then a lot. then we became dependent on property & the focus of the movement was the balance sheet. and the crazies dropped out. the sylvias were summoned only when the spectacle of an angry fighter looked terrific on tv. and sylvia would go to jail for us. but nix on the outrage at the social functions.
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“rich old daddies don’t support transvestites. nor do they will their money to liberation movements. so one has to go outside for support. . . . this year, [pride cost] $4500. last year, [it] cost pennies. . . . however, a lot of people saw a terrific show. my roommate said it was the best day of his life. sylvia said it was the worst day of hers.” #resist
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18 6,943 12 hours ago
"gay liberation front — are we a load of screaming queens? yes! are we a load of butch dykes? yes! filthy reds? yes! cocksuckers? yeah! freaks — beautiful people — right on," london g*y liberation front flyer, london, united kingdom, c. 1971. #lgbthistory #haveprideinhistory #resist #night
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“[SOUTH] BAY GAY & LESBIAN YOUTH SUPPORT GROUP” contingent, Gay Pride Day, San Jose, California, June 23, 1984. Photo by Ted Sahl, c/o @sjsu. #lgbthistory #HavePrideInHistory #Resist
10 4,453 20 hours ago
“[south] bay g*y & lesbian youth support group” contingent, g*y pride day, san jose, california, june 23, 1984. photo by ted sahl, c/o @sjsu. #lgbthistory #haveprideinhistory #resist
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Alan Turing (June 23, 1912 - June 7, 1954), c. 1930.
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Alan Turing, who was born 107 years ago today, was a British computer scientist, mathematician, cryptanalyst, and theoretical biologist, best-known as the parent of theoretical computer science and artificial intelligence.
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During World War II, Turing led Britain's codebreaking organization; it’s estimated that his work shortened the war in Europe by as many as four years. After the war, Turing worked at the National Physical Laboratory, where he directly contributed to the first designs of the stored-program computer.
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In 1952, an acquaintance of Turing’s lover burgled Turing's home. Upon reporting the crime, Turing acknowledged a sexual relationship with another man, leading police to charge both men with criminal gross indecency. Pleading guilty, Turing was given the choice between prison and probation, the latter of which was conditioned on undergoing hormonal treatment to reduce libido (i.e., chemical castration); Turing chose probation and
50 9,388 22 hours ago
Alan turing (june 23, 1912 - june 7, 1954), c. 1930.
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alan turing, who was born 107 years ago today, was a british computer scientist, mathematician, cryptanalyst, and theoretical biologist, best-known as the parent of theoretical computer science and artificial intelligence.
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during world war ii, turing led britain's codebreaking organization; it’s estimated that his work shortened the war in europe by as many as four years. after the war, turing worked at the national physical laboratory, where he directly contributed to the first designs of the stored-program computer.
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in 1952, an acquaintance of turing’s lover burgled turing's home. upon reporting the crime, turing acknowledged a s****l relationship with another man, leading police to charge both men with criminal gross indecency. pleading guilty, turing was given the choice between prison and probation, the latter of which was conditioned on undergoing hormonal treatment to reduce libido (i.e., chemical castration); turing chose probation and "treatment."
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on june 7, 1954, alan turing died from cyanide poisoning; he was 41. while his death was ruled a suicide, some argue turing was killed.
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in 2009, in response to growing demands for an apology, prime minister gordon brown offered the following: "while turing was dealt with under the law of the time and we can't put the clock back, his treatment was of course utterly unfair. so on behalf of the british government, and all those who live freely thanks to alan's work, i am very proud to say: we're sorry, you deserved so much better.”
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the caveat that “we can’t put the clock back” was correctly seen as cover failing to pardon turing, prompting calls for a full pardon. in 2013, queen elizabeth ii signed a pardon, leading activists to lambast the clearing of only turing’s name while letting stand countless other “gross indecency” convictions. in 2016, the u.k. enacted what is informally known as the “alan turing law,” retroactively pardoning men convicted under anti-homosexual laws. because the laws themselves were unjust, however, many see the pardons as inadequate, insisting instead on a more complete exoneration. #lgbthistory
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6 7,887 Yesterday
"stop crucifying q****s - outrage!," outrage! members protest anti-queer church policy, london, united kingdom, c. 1995. photo © steve mayes, c/o outrage! #lgbthistory #haveprideinhistory #sunday
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76 19,540 Yesterday
"bisexual pride!" pinback, design by elizabeth nania, 1987. from the collection of @lgbt_history. #lgbthistory #haveprideinhistory #resist #night
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“LESBIAN RIGHTS NOW,” Second Annual Dyke March (@nycdykemarchofficial), June 25, 1994. Photo by/copyright of Carolina Kroon (@carolapics).
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We proudly feature this image, along with the history of the Dyke March, in our book, “We Are Everywhere,” available via link in bio. #lgbthistory #HavePrideInHistory #WeAreEverywhere #RollingIntoSaturdayNightLike
16 9,265 Yesterday
“lesbian rights now,” second annual d**e march (@nycdykemarchofficial ), june 25, 1994. photo by/copyright of carolina kroon (@carolapics ).
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we proudly feature this image, along with the history of the d**e march, in our book, “we are everywhere,” available via link in bio. #lgbthistory #haveprideinhistory #weareeverywhere #rollingintosaturdaynightlike
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“WOMEN WITH AIDS DIE 4x FASTER” — “PROSTITUTION IS NOT A MODE OF TRANSMISSION” — “♀to ♀IS NOT RESEARCHED” (partially obscured), ACT UP-WOMEN members and other demonstrators, Sixth International AIDS Conference, San Francisco, California, June 22, 1990. Photo © Rick Gerharter.
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We proudly feature this image—and others from the Sixth International Conference on AIDS—in our book, “We Are Everywhere,” available via link in bio. #lgbthistory #HavePrideInHistory #WeAreEverywhere #Resist
20 7,044 Yesterday
“women with aids die 4x faster” — “prostitution is not a mode of transmission” — “♀to ♀is not researched” (partially obscured), act up-women members and other demonstrators, sixth international aids conference, san francisco, california, june 22, 1990. photo © rick gerharter.
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we proudly feature this image—and others from the sixth international conference on aids—in our book, “we are everywhere,” available via link in bio. #lgbthistory #haveprideinhistory #weareeverywhere #resist
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[CW] “…in San Francisco, three days before Gay Pride Day, a person was killed just because he was gay. And that night, I walked among the sad and the frustrated at City Hall in San Francisco and later that night as they lit candles on Castro Street and stood in silence, reaching out for some symbolic thing that would give them hope. These were strong people...They were strong, but even they needed hope.” – Harvey Milk, Gay Freedom Day, San Francisco, June 26, 1977
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Picture:
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[cw] “…in san francisco, three days before g*y pride day, a person was killed just because he was gay. and that night, i walked among the sad and the frustrated at city hall in san francisco and later that night as they lit candles on castro street and stood in silence, reaching out for some symbolic thing that would give them hope. these were strong people...they were strong, but even they needed hope.” – harvey milk, g*y freedom day, san francisco, june 26, 1977
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picture: "robert hillsborough, why? why? why? why?” – “we care” – "robert: 1945-1977” – “we are your children” – “save our human rights” – “we’re god’s children too!,” robert hillsborough memorial, city hall, san francisco, june 26, 1977. photo © daniel nicoletta (@dannic100 ).
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just after midnight on june 22, 1977, forty-two years ago today, 33-year-old robert hillsborough and his on-again-off-again boyfriend, jerry taylor, left a restaurant a few blocks from home in san francisco's mission district. as they walked to their car, they were accosted by a group of men shouting anti-gay slurs; hillsborough and taylor sped off, thinking they were free.
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in fact, they'd been followed, and their attackers descended on the pair as they arrived home.
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nineteen-year-old john cordova stabbed robert hillsborough fifteen times; taylor, though badly beaten, managed to escape.
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witnesses reported that cordova yelled “faggot” repeatedly while stabbing hillsborough and, at least once, he shouted "this one's for anita!," a reference to anti-queer demagogue anita bryant.
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hillsborough died less than an hour after the attack.
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days later, san franciscans turned 1977 g*y freedom day into a memorial for hillsborough.
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cordova was convicted of second-degree murder, receiving ten years in prison. at trial, the judge denied a motion to introduce evidence showing that cordova had s****l relationships with men in the months prior to the murder. #haveprideinhistory #resist
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“DO YOU CARE?” Eric Sawyer (@ericsawyernyc) and other members of @actupny participate in a protest with leaders of mainstream gay & lesbian organizations, The White House, June 1, 1987. Photo by Doug Hinckle, c/o @washblade.
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The demonstration pictured here, held the day after Ronald Reagan’s first substantive address on the HIV/AIDS epidemic (which by then had been on the public radar for six years), was a watershed moment in that mainstream leaders seemed willing to eschew moderate tactics in favor of militant street activism.
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We discuss this era in detail—and proudly feature this image—in our book, “We Are Everywhere: Protest, Power, and Pride in the History of Queer Liberation,” available via the link in our bio. #lgbthistory #HavePrideInHistory #WeAreEverywhere #Mood
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“do you care?” eric sawyer (@ericsawyernyc ) and other members of @actupny participate in a protest with leaders of mainstream g*y & lesbian organizations, the white house, june 1, 1987. photo by doug hinckle, c/o @washblade.
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the demonstration pictured here, held the day after ronald reagan’s first substantive address on the hiv/aids epidemic (which by then had been on the public radar for six years), was a watershed moment in that mainstream leaders seemed willing to eschew moderate tactics in favor of militant street activism.
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we discuss this era in detail—and proudly feature this image—in our book, “we are everywhere: protest, power, and pride in the history of q***r liberation,” available via the link in our bio. #lgbthistory #haveprideinhistory #weareeverywhere #mood
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“LESBIANAS DE COLOR – LESBIANS OF COLOR,” Christopher Street West Parade, West Hollywood, California, July 1, 1979. Photographer unknown, c/o L. Brown & M. Riemer.
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We proudly feature this image in our book, “We Are Everywhere,” available via the link in our bio.
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If you’re in Los Angeles tonight (6/20), come get a copy of the book signed by @matthew.riemer, who’ll be talking with the incredible @ashleemariepreston at the @bloomingdales Beverly Center to benefit @onearchives. More info in our story! #lgbthistory #HavePrideInHistory #Resist
16 5,420 3 days ago
“lesbianas de color – l******s of color,” christopher street west parade, west hollywood, california, july 1, 1979. photographer unknown, c/o l. brown & m. riemer.
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we proudly feature this image in our book, “we are everywhere,” available via the link in our bio.
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if you’re in los angeles tonight (6/20), come get a copy of the book signed by @matthew.riemer, who’ll be talking with the incredible @ashleemariepreston at the @bloomingdales beverly center to benefit @onearchives. more info in our story! #lgbthistory #haveprideinhistory #resist
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“books don’t say much
about what I did
but I was there
& I kept on moving.” – Pat Parker, “Movement in Black”
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Picture: Pat Parker (Jan. 20, 1944 – June 17, 1989), c. 1980. Photo © Joan E. Biren (JEB)
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Pat Parker, who died 30 years ago today, was a revolutionary Black lesbian-feminist poet whose work, as Audre Lorde wrote in 1978, “would not need any introduction except for the racism and heterosexism of a poetry establishment which has whited out Parker from the recognition deserved by a dynamic and original voice.”
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After leaving her home in Texas at seventeen, Parker moved to Los Angeles and earned her undergraduate and graduate degrees. In 1962, she married playwright Ed Bullins, who was physically abusive; the two separated in 1966. Although she married a second time, Parker soon realized that “the idea of marriage . . . wasn’t working.” By the late 1960s, she identified as lesbian.
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In 1968, Parker started reading poetry at Women’s centers, bookstores, coffeehouses, and other Lesbian and/or Feminist events and spaces; she met Audre Lorde, a close friend and collaborator, in 1969. In the 1970s, Parker was active with the Black Panthers and various queer liberation organizations; she toured with the Varied Voices of Black Women in 1979. In 1980, she founded the Black Women’s Revolutionary Council and helped form the Women’s Press Collective.
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Parker’s poetry—“My Hands Are Big and Rough,” “Have You Ever Tried to Hide?”, “Where Do You Go to Become a Non-Citizen?”, “Don’t Let the Fascists Speak,” “Movement in Black,” “My Lover Is a Woman,” “For the Straight Folks Who Don’t Mind Gays But Wish They Weren’t So BLATANT,” and so many others—is astounding.
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“Her Black Woman’s voice rings true and deep and gentle, with an iron echo,” Audre Lorde wrote.
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Pat Parker died of breast cancer on June 17, 1989; she was forty-five. #lgbthistory #HavePrideInHistory #Resist #PatParker
37 5,247 4 days ago
“books don’t say much
about what i did
but i was there
& i kept on moving.” – pat parker, “movement in black”
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picture: pat parker (jan. 20, 1944 – june 17, 1989), c. 1980. photo © joan e. biren (jeb)
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pat parker, who died 30 years ago today, was a revolutionary black lesbian-feminist poet whose work, as audre lorde wrote in 1978, “would not need any introduction except for the racism and heterosexism of a poetry establishment which has whited out parker from the recognition deserved by a dynamic and original voice.”
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after leaving her home in texas at seventeen, parker moved to los angeles and earned her undergraduate and graduate degrees. in 1962, she married playwright ed bullins, who was physically abusive; the two separated in 1966. although she married a second time, parker soon realized that “the idea of marriage . . . wasn’t working.” by the late 1960s, she identified as lesbian.
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in 1968, parker started reading poetry at women’s centers, bookstores, coffeehouses, and other lesbian and/or feminist events and spaces; she met audre lorde, a close friend and collaborator, in 1969. in the 1970s, parker was active with the black panthers and various q***r liberation organizations; she toured with the varied voices of black women in 1979. in 1980, she founded the black women’s revolutionary council and helped form the women’s press collective.
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parker’s poetry—“my hands are big and rough,” “have you ever tried to hide?”, “where do you go to become a non-citizen?”, “don’t let the fascists speak,” “movement in black,” “my lover is a woman,” “for the straight folks who don’t mind g**s but wish they weren’t so blatant,” and so many others—is astounding.
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“her black woman’s voice rings true and deep and gentle, with an iron echo,” audre lorde wrote.
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pat parker died of b****t cancer on june 17, 1989; she was forty-five. #lgbthistory #haveprideinhistory #resist #patparker