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womenphotograph

Women Photograph An evergreen catalogue of independent women photojournalists. Working to elevate the voices of female + nonbinary visual storytellers. http://womenphotograph.com/
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womenphotograph

@womenphotograph

Women Photograph
Photo by @btihal_remli from the series „Country of Women“

In the valleys of the High Atlas in Morocco, where small Berber communities and some families are still living on itinerant pasture, the women are usually in charge of the animals: a cow, two or three goats, a few hens, and a donkey for carrying. There are only a few men and they are really discreet: adults are at the market in the valley, young men go abroad, and the elderly do some maintenance tasks here and there. Here, women and young girls are running entire villages. 
They carry the daily grind on their shoulders. These women ensure the survival of a territory and are gaining visibility, power and independence. 
The „Country of Women“ is an ongoing series on a socio-economical portrait of contemporary rural Morocco.
1 260 52 minutes ago
Photo by @btihal_remli from the series „country of women“

in the valleys of the high atlas in morocco, where small berber communities and some families are still living on itinerant pasture, the women are usually in charge of the animals: a cow, two or three goats, a few hens, and a donkey for carrying. there are only a few men and they are really discreet: adults are at the market in the valley, young men go abroad, and the elderly do some maintenance tasks here and there. here, women and young girls are running entire villages.
they carry the daily grind on their shoulders. these women ensure the survival of a territory and are gaining visibility, power and independence.
the „country of women“ is an ongoing series on a socio-economical portrait of contemporary rural morocco.
womenphotograph

@womenphotograph

Women Photograph
Photo by @btihal_remli from the series „Country of Women“

In the valleys of the High Atlas in Morocco, where small Berber communities and some families are still living on itinerant pasture, the women are usually in charge of the animals: a cow, two or three goats, a few hens, and a donkey for carrying. There are only a few men and they are really discreet: adults are at the market in the valley, young men go abroad, and the elderly do some maintenance tasks here and there. Here, women and young girls are running entire villages. 
They carry the daily grind on their shoulders. These women ensure the survival of a territory and are gaining visibility, power and independence. 
The „Country of Women“ is an ongoing series on a socio-economical portrait of contemporary rural Morocco.
4 829 23 hours ago
Photo by @btihal_remli from the series „country of women“

in the valleys of the high atlas in morocco, where small berber communities and some families are still living on itinerant pasture, the women are usually in charge of the animals: a cow, two or three goats, a few hens, and a donkey for carrying. there are only a few men and they are really discreet: adults are at the market in the valley, young men go abroad, and the elderly do some maintenance tasks here and there. here, women and young girls are running entire villages.
they carry the daily grind on their shoulders. these women ensure the survival of a territory and are gaining visibility, power and independence.
the „country of women“ is an ongoing series on a socio-economical portrait of contemporary rural morocco.
womenphotograph

@womenphotograph

Women Photograph
Photo by @btihal_remli from the series „Country of Women“

In the valleys of the High Atlas in Morocco, where small Berber communities and some families are still living on itinerant pasture, the women are usually in charge of the animals: a cow, two or three goats, a few hens, and a donkey for carrying. There are only a few men and they are really discreet: adults are at the market in the valley, young men go abroad, and the elderly do some maintenance tasks here and there. Here, women and young girls are running entire villages. 
They carry the daily grind on their shoulders. These women ensure the survival of a territory and are gaining visibility, power and independence. 
The „Country of Women“ is an ongoing series on a socio-economical portrait of contemporary rural Morocco.
6 674 Yesterday
Photo by @btihal_remli from the series „country of women“

in the valleys of the high atlas in morocco, where small berber communities and some families are still living on itinerant pasture, the women are usually in charge of the animals: a cow, two or three goats, a few hens, and a donkey for carrying. there are only a few men and they are really discreet: adults are at the market in the valley, young men go abroad, and the elderly do some maintenance tasks here and there. here, women and young girls are running entire villages.
they carry the daily grind on their shoulders. these women ensure the survival of a territory and are gaining visibility, power and independence.
the „country of women“ is an ongoing series on a socio-economical portrait of contemporary rural morocco.
womenphotograph

@womenphotograph

Women Photograph
Photo by @btihal_remli from the series „Country of Women“

In the valleys of the High Atlas in Morocco, where small Berber communities and some families are still living on itinerant pasture, the women are usually in charge of the animals: a cow, two or three goats, a few hens, and a donkey for carrying. There are only a few men and they are really discreet: adults are at the market in the valley, young men go abroad, and the elderly do some maintenance tasks here and there. Here, women and young girls are running entire villages. 
They carry the daily grind on their shoulders. These women ensure the survival of a territory and are gaining visibility, power and independence. 
The „Country of Women“ is an ongoing series on a socio-economical portrait of contemporary rural Morocco.
5 813 2 days ago
Photo by @btihal_remli from the series „country of women“

in the valleys of the high atlas in morocco, where small berber communities and some families are still living on itinerant pasture, the women are usually in charge of the animals: a cow, two or three goats, a few hens, and a donkey for carrying. there are only a few men and they are really discreet: adults are at the market in the valley, young men go abroad, and the elderly do some maintenance tasks here and there. here, women and young girls are running entire villages.
they carry the daily grind on their shoulders. these women ensure the survival of a territory and are gaining visibility, power and independence.
the „country of women“ is an ongoing series on a socio-economical portrait of contemporary rural morocco.
womenphotograph

@womenphotograph

Women Photograph
Photo by @lena_mucha | Angélica, 17:
7 1,041 3 days ago
Photo by @lena_mucha | angélica, 17: "i felt that i was different when i was 12. i liked to wear dresses and play with girls", she says. at the age of 15 she left her home village and decided to work on the coffee plantations in risaralda.

in the mountains of colombia’s coffee region, colourful dressed transgender indigenous people work on the lush green farms.

back home in their communities they are not accepted due to their transgender identity. they are punished or forced to leave their villages. the emberá, the ethnical group they belong to, are convinced that it is a contagious disease that the white men has passed them.

nevertheless, on these coffee farms they are recognized. they work hard and every evening after returning from the fields, they wear their typical dresses, jewelery and transform into women. „i won´t go back to my community. here i can finally be who i am and live my identity“, says angelica one of the girls or primos“ (cousins), which they are called in the village.

my name is lena mucha. i am a german photojournalist based between berlin and colombia. in my work i focus on stories related tohuman rights, gender aspects and social changes within societies and ethnic groups that are mainly under-reported.
thanks for following this week!
womenphotograph

@womenphotograph

Women Photograph
Photo by @lena_mucha | Francy, 19, and Dario, 24. 
In the mountains of Colombia’s coffee region, colorfully dressed transgender indigenous people work on the lush green farms.

Back home in their communities they are not accepted due to their transgender identity. They are punished or forced to leave their villages. The Emberá, the ethnical group they belong to, are convinced that it is a contagious disease that the white men has passed them.

Nevertheless, on these coffee farms they are recognized. They work hard and every evening after returning from the fields, they wear their typical dresses, jewelery and transform into women. „I won´t go back to my community. Here I can finally be who I am and live my identity“, says Angelica one of the girls or primos“ (cousins), which they are called in the village.
7 1,119 3 days ago
Photo by @lena_mucha | francy, 19, and dario, 24.
in the mountains of colombia’s coffee region, colorfully dressed transgender indigenous people work on the lush green farms.

back home in their communities they are not accepted due to their transgender identity. they are punished or forced to leave their villages. the emberá, the ethnical group they belong to, are convinced that it is a contagious disease that the white men has passed them.

nevertheless, on these coffee farms they are recognized. they work hard and every evening after returning from the fields, they wear their typical dresses, jewelery and transform into women. „i won´t go back to my community. here i can finally be who i am and live my identity“, says angelica one of the girls or primos“ (cousins), which they are called in the village.
womenphotograph

@womenphotograph

Women Photograph
Photo by @lena_mucha |  Omayra and Angelica are sitting on top of the truck heading back to the farm after a labour day. 
In the mountains of Colombia’s coffee region, colorfully dressed transgender indigenous people work on the lush green farms.

Back home in their communities they are not accepted due to their transgender identity. They are punished or forced to leave their villages. The Emberá, the ethnic group they belong to, are convinced that it is a contagious disease that the white men has passed them.

Nevertheless, on these coffee farms they are recognized. They work hard and every evening after returning from the fields, they wear their typical dresses, jewelery and transform into women. “I won´t go back to my community. Here I can finally be who I am and live my identity“, says Angelica one of the girls or primos“ (cousins), which they are called in the village.
1 394 4 days ago
Photo by @lena_mucha | omayra and angelica are sitting on top of the truck heading back to the farm after a labour day.
in the mountains of colombia’s coffee region, colorfully dressed transgender indigenous people work on the lush green farms.

back home in their communities they are not accepted due to their transgender identity. they are punished or forced to leave their villages. the emberá, the ethnic group they belong to, are convinced that it is a contagious disease that the white men has passed them.

nevertheless, on these coffee farms they are recognized. they work hard and every evening after returning from the fields, they wear their typical dresses, jewelery and transform into women. “i won´t go back to my community. here i can finally be who i am and live my identity“, says angelica one of the girls or primos“ (cousins), which they are called in the village.
womenphotograph

@womenphotograph

Women Photograph
Photo by @lena_mucha | Yuliana, 19, is working on the coffee plantation close to the village Santuario. She belongs to the ethnic group of Emberá Katio and comes from the eastern pacific region Chocó. 
In the mountains of Colombia’s coffee region, colorfully dressed transgender indigenous people work on the lush green farms.

Back home in their communities they are not accepted due to their transgender identity. They are punished or forced to leave their villages. The Emberá, the ethnical group they belong to, are convinced that it is a contagious disease that the white men has passed them.

Nevertheless, on these coffee farms they are recognized. They work hard and every evening after returning from the fields, they wear their typical dresses, jewelery and transform into women. „I won´t go back to my community. Here I can finally be who I am and live my identity“, says Angelica one of the girls or primos“ (cousins), which they are called in the village.
4 1,294 5 days ago
Photo by @lena_mucha | yuliana, 19, is working on the coffee plantation close to the village santuario. she belongs to the ethnic group of emberá katio and comes from the eastern pacific region chocó.
in the mountains of colombia’s coffee region, colorfully dressed transgender indigenous people work on the lush green farms.

back home in their communities they are not accepted due to their transgender identity. they are punished or forced to leave their villages. the emberá, the ethnical group they belong to, are convinced that it is a contagious disease that the white men has passed them.

nevertheless, on these coffee farms they are recognized. they work hard and every evening after returning from the fields, they wear their typical dresses, jewelery and transform into women. „i won´t go back to my community. here i can finally be who i am and live my identity“, says angelica one of the girls or primos“ (cousins), which they are called in the village.
womenphotograph

@womenphotograph

Women Photograph
Photo by @lena_mucha | Francy, 19, is sitting on the balcony of the farm in the evening after being dressed. She belongs to the ehtnic group of Emberá Katio and lives together with her couple Dario on the coffee farm.

In the mountains of Colombia’s coffee region, colorfully dressed transgender indigenous people work on the lush green farms.

Back home in their communities they are not accepted due to their transgender identity. They are punished or forced to leave their villages. The Emberá, the ethnical group they belong to, are convinced that it is a contagious disease that the white men has passed them.

Nevertheless, on these coffee farms they are recognized. They work hard and every evening after returning from the fields, they wear their typical dresses, jewelery and transform into women. „I won´t go back to my community. Here I can finally be who I am and live my identity“, says Angelica one of the girls or primos“ (cousins), which they are called in the village.
10 1,361 5 days ago
Photo by @lena_mucha | francy, 19, is sitting on the balcony of the farm in the evening after being dressed. she belongs to the ehtnic group of emberá katio and lives together with her couple dario on the coffee farm.

in the mountains of colombia’s coffee region, colorfully dressed transgender indigenous people work on the lush green farms.

back home in their communities they are not accepted due to their transgender identity. they are punished or forced to leave their villages. the emberá, the ethnical group they belong to, are convinced that it is a contagious disease that the white men has passed them.

nevertheless, on these coffee farms they are recognized. they work hard and every evening after returning from the fields, they wear their typical dresses, jewelery and transform into women. „i won´t go back to my community. here i can finally be who i am and live my identity“, says angelica one of the girls or primos“ (cousins), which they are called in the village.
womenphotograph

@womenphotograph

Women Photograph
Photo by @lena_mucha | Milena, 16, joined the ELN in September 2017.
3 616 6 days ago
Photo by @lena_mucha | milena, 16, joined the eln in september 2017. "i always liked the guerrilla, even as a young girl i was impressed how they were fighting for our people and how they treated our community." 2. photo: view on the village in the morning, where the rebels stayed for 2 weeks before heading back to the jungle.

last year i had the opportunity to spend some time with young rebel fighters in colombia. after the farc gave up their weapons in mid 2017, the eln - the national liberation army - , is the last armed rebel group in colombia.

as politicians and media talk peace, the eln is preparing for war, dangling love and justice to recruit teenagers into their ranks. in remote camps in the eastern department chocó, they are trained to fight, as the ceasefire with the government ended in early january.

the motivation for these teenagers goes beyond a political ideology. due to a lack of opportunities many see it as the only way to leave their homes, escape domestic violence or in search for a sense in their lives.

daily life in these camps might look like a summer camp, but their unwitting role in a complex political situation is much more sinister. the eln is 2000-2500 strong, and judging by the speeches made to groups of children as young as 8, there are no plans to lay down their weapons.
my name is lena mucha. i am a german photojournalist based between berlin and colombia. in my work i focus on stories related tohuman rights, gender aspects and social changes within societies and ethnic groups that are mainly under-reported.
thanks for following!
womenphotograph

@womenphotograph

Women Photograph
Photo by @lena_mucha |Jeison, 23 and his wife in their house where they are staying together with other guerrilla members. While she is not member of the ELN, she came to see her husband and father of their 1 year old son for the time the group is living in the small village.
0 403 6 days ago
Photo by @lena_mucha |jeison, 23 and his wife in their house where they are staying together with other guerrilla members. while she is not member of the eln, she came to see her husband and father of their 1 year old son for the time the group is living in the small village. "when i go back to hide in the jungle, i dont know when i will see my family again. it´s hard. i am missing my son when i am out there". 2. photo: weapon of one of the teenagers. 3. photo: "ni un paso atras: liberación o muerte" (not one step back: liberation or death). slogan of the eln who carries every member.
womenphotograph

@womenphotograph

Women Photograph
Photo by @lena_mucha | A young guerrilla fighter is resting at night. The rebels must have their weapon at every moment.

Last year I had the opportunity to spend some time with young rebel fighters in Colombia. After the FARC gave up their weapons in mid 2017, the ELN - the National Liberation Army - , is the last armed rebel group in Colombia.

As politicians and media talk peace, the ELN is preparing for war, dangling love and justice to recruit teenagers into their ranks. In remote camps in the eastern department Chocó, they are trained to fight, as the ceasefire with the government ended in early January.

The motivation for these teenagers goes beyond a political ideology. Due to a lack of opportunities many see it as the only way to leave their homes, escape domestic violence or in search for a sense in their lives.

Daily life in these camps might look like a summer camp, but their unwitting role in a complex political situation is much more sinister. The ELN is 2000-2500 strong, and judging by the speeches made to groups of children as young as 8, there are no plans to lay down their weapons. 
My name is Lena Mucha. I am a german photojournalist based between Berlin and Colombia. In my work I focus on stories related tohuman rights, gender aspects and social changes within societies and ethnic groups that are mainly under-reported. 
Thanks for following!
2 475 1 weeks ago
Photo by @lena_mucha | a young guerrilla fighter is resting at night. the rebels must have their weapon at every moment.

last year i had the opportunity to spend some time with young rebel fighters in colombia. after the farc gave up their weapons in mid 2017, the eln - the national liberation army - , is the last armed rebel group in colombia.

as politicians and media talk peace, the eln is preparing for war, dangling love and justice to recruit teenagers into their ranks. in remote camps in the eastern department chocó, they are trained to fight, as the ceasefire with the government ended in early january.

the motivation for these teenagers goes beyond a political ideology. due to a lack of opportunities many see it as the only way to leave their homes, escape domestic violence or in search for a sense in their lives.

daily life in these camps might look like a summer camp, but their unwitting role in a complex political situation is much more sinister. the eln is 2000-2500 strong, and judging by the speeches made to groups of children as young as 8, there are no plans to lay down their weapons.
my name is lena mucha. i am a german photojournalist based between berlin and colombia. in my work i focus on stories related tohuman rights, gender aspects and social changes within societies and ethnic groups that are mainly under-reported.
thanks for following!